White Girls Get Weave For The First Time And It’s A Big Deal “Apparently”

White girls and weaveHave you guys seen the video of white girls getting a weave for the first time? A lot of the blogs are calling it hilarious mostly because the content is hilarious based on what the women were saying, but I have to be honest, it isn’t that revolutionary in my opinion.

I always assumed white girls installed weaves all the time, but I am not sure if the way they install the hair is the same as black girls.

The video was created by Deandra Giselle, who is a weave specialist and owner of The Bar Hair Studio in California, and she installed weaves on 3 comedians who never had weave before.

Their reactions were funny because the whole weave thing was just so foreign to them and it was interesting to watch the process as well as how their feelings changed once they saw themselves with a weave.

Other than that I am not sure what the big deal was because it isn’t as if weave is synonymous with black girl even though black girls do wear weaves.

I suppose it would have been more of a spectacle if the title were “White Girls Tries An Afro For The First Time” because then I would be almost positive it would be a ‘life changing experience”. But that’s just me!

To be fair there are a ton of black women who have not tried weaves either but I hardly think they would command as much interest as white women. It’s sort of like when white guys rap or dance to hip-hop, suddenly the fact that the guys are white validates or makes the talent that more interesting. I digress!

The video did very well with over 2million views I can tell there are a lot of people who do not agree with me and they do find the subject to be rather interesting.

Watch below:

About Petra


Hi I'm Petra Lomax , a staff writer and editor for BlackHairInformation.com . I am Jamaican born and raised and moved to the United States in my early 20's. I have a BA in Political Science and International relations as well as an MBA and a Masters In Project Management. I love travel, culture and anything that has to do with creative media and business.

About Petra


Hi I'm Petra Lomax , a staff writer and editor for BlackHairInformation.com . I am Jamaican born and raised and moved to the United States in my early 20's. I have a BA in Political Science and International relations as well as an MBA and a Masters In Project Management. I love travel, culture and anything that has to do with creative media and business.

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  • “Weaves and extensions are different things!!” loool ok.

  • You see that too always have to flattering when it’s come to the white lady and who f**king care about their reactions jizzz

    • The “difference” between extensions and weaves is annoyingly stupid. They’re one and the same, but of course one has a negative connotation and the other just exists.. ????

  • To be honest, Caucasian women started wearing weaves first many years ago. They wore them to make their hair fuller. So this isn’t anything new.

    • First?? Sista, are you sure bc I recall Egyptians installing weaves thousands of years ago.

    • Your right. I’ll give credit when its due. I looked it up. Although my comment above may not of been fully accurate, my point is, Caucasian women wore pieces, wigs, and weave too. Way more than black women.

    • Lolalao

      Thank you!!!!! I guess ppl forget about “The Golden Ages” . Back in those times they wore a WEAVE. They’ve always used WEAVE. Wig & weaves are the exact same…Antebellum period= WEAVE.

  • Do you !!!

  • BlueCornMoon

    White women have been doing this for many years,esp in the performing arts. In fact, wig wearing goes back to Ancient Egypt & Europe in the 1700’s & 1800’s when MEN WORE POWDERED WIGS & women wore fancy styles SUPPLEMENTED WITH ARTIFICIAL HAIR. Read this about wigs https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wig#Ancient_use It’s odd how there are so many knowledge gaps in today’s world, esp among our people. My schoolmates & I, in the 60s, knew all about wigs when our moms & other black women started buying wigs to protect their hair or to avoid messing with hair when they didn’t feel like it. They said white women did it & I can recall seeing a lot of wig ads for white women in magazines. There was no fuss about “fake hair” and “trying to be what you’re not” like you hear today. Some pals & I even wore them for awhile after relaxers messed up our hair . Same for some women. As a teacher I found that many of today’s students thought only blacks wore wigs & weaves & they’d argue with me. I told them that white folks’ wigs look like their natural hair so you can’t always tell, but that we blacks buy ones that don’t always look like our hair because we want to wear styles that look good on us but could damage our hair if we used perms to get those styles.