A Dominican Hair Salon Redefines Natural Hair And Beauty

Dominican Hair SalonWe’ve all heard salon horror stories when it comes to natural hair, and that’s why most of us prefer to treat our tresses at home.

There have been stories of Dominican hair salons using relaxers in their conditioners, causing heat damage by excessive blow outs, or just the dirty looks some naturals may get when they walk in the door.

That’s why many naturalistas, especially those in the Dominican Republic, can now rejoice because there’s a salon that caters to and embraces their natural hair.

Carolina Contreras, the owner of Miss Rizos, spent her life raised between the USA and the Dominican Republic. After going on a personal hair journey from chemically treated hair, she learned a lot about how to care for and embrace her naturally curly hair.

The mantra of her natural hair salon is “Yo amor mi pajón”, which means “I love my big, kinky hair”, and it’s to show support for all ladies that rock their own curls. She was able to open her salon with funding from her savings, donations, and a successful Indiegogo campaign that raised $10,000.

In addition to her salon, Contreras also has her own blog to document the things she’s learned. “There were many blogs in English but not many in Spanish,” she said about her website, which is missrizos.com.

The website, which is entirely in Spanish, shares some of her videos, press from her mentions in various publications like the New York Times, and a contact number if you’d like to make an appointment at the salon.
Contreras is doing an amazing thing for women with naturally curly hair.


She and her salon are helping women all over to embrace the hair they have, regardless of where they’re from. It’s great to see how far the natural hair movement has spread, and it’ll be great to see where it continues to grow. In the meantime, make sure to check out Miss Rizos if you are able to travel to the Caribbean!

About Victoria


Hi! My name is Victoria Sallie and I'm a twenty something year old blogger & student living in NYC. I began my transitioning natural hair journey in January 2013, and big chopped in April 2014. I decided to start writing because I wanted to document my hair journey, plus I realized that I couldn't find all the information I needed in ONE place on the internet. Deciding to return back to my natural hair was one of the best choices that I've ever made, and I'm glad to help anyone that has a question. Happy Hair Journey!

About Victoria


Hi! My name is Victoria Sallie and I'm a twenty something year old blogger & student living in NYC. I began my transitioning natural hair journey in January 2013, and big chopped in April 2014. I decided to start writing because I wanted to document my hair journey, plus I realized that I couldn't find all the information I needed in ONE place on the internet. Deciding to return back to my natural hair was one of the best choices that I've ever made, and I'm glad to help anyone that has a question. Happy Hair Journey!

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Comments

    1. Cee Turner

      I think the Dominican Republic. It’s odd that the article didn’t make it clear.

  1. Nichole Davis

    Man listen the Dominicans are the ones who made my hair healthy and long. Natural products from their island

    1. Ajah

      I know I had no idea. My head is burning just thinking about it. Ouch.

    1. Ajah

      There are a lot of them out there that are doing it, I have no doubt that more will come around.

  2. Valerie Ohiri Yao

    Yep so true..smh went once there for a blow dry, and omg! Wish I was never there smh my hair was fried.. And the way they treat African kinky/coarse hair type is awful!so much heat, and hard combing/brushing..I felt like my hair was falling on the ground, the hot was so hot, it almost touch my skinfrom that moment, I told myself, never again will I go there. Natural hair is delicate. Beside, I only like using their hair products at home, but never the salon again.

    1. Lolalao

      Don’t start me with trimming. They always cut my hair!!!! I’m like I’ve got to learn, I did.

  3. Ajah

    I don’t ever say “I would like a trim” that is code for, “I would like you to cut my hair.” The lingo you use is “I would like to dust my ends.” Dusting tells them (if they are worth their salt then they know what that term means) to just cut the split ends. I learned that from Felecia Leatherwood

  4. Ajah

    Well it always takes 1 to make the change. Then others will follow suit. Good for her.

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