Breaking Down Barriers, Natural Hair And My Career

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When was the last time you wore your natural hair to work? I mean twist outs, sister locs, or even the signature Afro strutting what you got to your cubicle, desk, or office. Maybe years ago you could have answered, “Rarely.”  And you know what? No one could be upset with you. Why? Because being natural was not the most appropriate style for the work place.

Natural hair (Afro, braids, locs, etc.) was not accepted point-blank-period. Decades ago, it was very rare that a woman would wear her natural hair out at work. She would wear sew-ins, wigs, and lace fronts. Even just a few years ago, wearing a natural hair style to a job interview could create a possibility to experience prejudice and bias to the applicant.

The qualities and assets to the company a naturalista would have would go unnoticed. Now as of today, wearing your natural hair is more than just a mainstream style of hair, but “she” is becoming an accepted entity among job industries and professional businesses.

There are teachers and other educators in primary and secondary schools who are rocking their TWA’s with a fierce and proud boldness.  Employees in government are wearing their dread locs and sister locs, while still being tasteful with their upkeep and neatness.

Even Senegalese twists, micro braids, and box braids are becoming the normal standard for naturalistas to wear in the work place. Women now are accessorizing their hair in the fun tapered cuts, twist outs, braid outs, and more! Is the barrier of hiding our natural breaking down at last?

Personally, I have come in contact with the “naturalista in the work place” head on from the job interview, to being hired, and now in government for almost two years! Although, being natural is part of my personality, my work ethic is based on my potential and the great effort that I put in my work. That’s what it should be based on, right?


In the beginning

It was October 2012 when I first declared that I was natural and I was not going to hide my hair under weave or sew-ins any longer. When searching for the industry I wanted to grow in career-wise, I was determined that it would need to go along with my natural hair journey, so I received a phone call for an interview in be in Government.

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About Christina J


Hey there! My name is Christina J. I am a healthy hair advocate and have been natural since October 2012. In June 2014, I decided to start my blog, Desire My Natural! to document my hair journey and other fun topics (family, health, inspiration, more). As I share, help, encourage, and support others in their healthy hair journey, I am continuing my own.

About Christina J


Hey there! My name is Christina J. I am a healthy hair advocate and have been natural since October 2012. In June 2014, I decided to start my blog, Desire My Natural! to document my hair journey and other fun topics (family, health, inspiration, more). As I share, help, encourage, and support others in their healthy hair journey, I am continuing my own.

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Chala M. Brooks

It’s getting there but still has a ways to go.

Mieshel Jett

More acceptable up north…. South it’s moving slowly

TMW98
TMW98

Not true about the South. I started wearing protective box braids to my very white collar job in Texas back in the early 90’s even though I didn’t go natural until recently. Braids was how I stretched my relaxers long before the natural movement rolled in. Once I broke the ice back in the 90s others quickly followed suit. Now I’m natural, white collar government worker in Louisiana and wear a huge Angela Davis afro everyday. I keep it neat, pat it with a scarf in the morning so its nice and even. Like the author of this article I get tons of questions but no flack. Its been accepted and now more and more women in my office have stopped the twist outs and such and are wearing their afros too. Be an ice breaker and you will be surprised how many follow. But as the author of the article said, be professional with it, nice and neat. No outrageous Nubian knots pointing in every direction or crazy colors, LOL…. that’s better saved for days off and vacation.