A Little Dirt Won’t Hurt: How About a Clay Mix or Mud Wash?

Dead Sea ShorelineSpas have been using clays in their operations for some time too. You too might also be going “These natural/healthy hair quacks will do anything in the name of hair…that is nonsense,” but don’t knock it until you check out these cool facts about why the clay wash is here to stay.

Clay is a fine grained soil that is rich in minerals and traces of metal oxide as well as other organic material like decayed rocks or soil or ash. Clay exhibits a plastic like quality when it comes in contact with water and it can hold water for long periods of time. There are different types of clay, each classified by the concentration of certain minerals.

Owing to the mineral rich character of clay, wide variations of it is used for a number of cosmetic purposes especially with hair. Clay washes are said to be gentler than commercial shampoos and stronger than co-washes, so they are ideal for those who want an organic cleansing solution that does not have harmful chemicals to strip hair or contribute to possible side effects in the long term. There are rave reviews for the Terressentials mud wash and Bentonite Clay, but I wanted to delve a little and see what else exists.

Dead Sea Mud

This comes from the Vale of Siddim or Salt Sea referred to in the Bible so it has a very interesting history. It is rich in magnesium, sodium, potassium and calcium. It’s odd that the soil from here actually pulls out toxins in the skin and stimulates the regeneration of cells to assist with hair growth, considering that no marine life can grow in the Dead Sea owing to its high salt content.

Kaolin Clay

Kaolin clay also called China clay, white clay or Multini Mitti results from decomposed volcanic ash and is rich in silica and does a good job at detoxing as well. It can come in a variation of green, pink, yellow or grey hues regardless of being called “white clay”. It is often used in face powders and other skin care products. This is thought to be especially great for chronically dry hair since it is the gentlest of clays. It helps increase the elasticity of hair, ultimately boosting its tensile strength. It is not ideal for oily hair types though because it does not draw out oils and does not get rid of heavy buildup.


Originally posted 2014-08-03 15:00:58.

About Marsha Buchanan


As a Jamaican girl raised in a devout church family headed by my mother, I have always had my natural hair, no chemical processing. After years of mistreating it , often ignorant of that fact, I began my healthy hair journey in January 2013 in fact, I have seen to it that my entire household falls in line where this is concerned. When I am not poring over some hair blog or forum I spend my time teaching English to rowdy high school students (ok maybe I have some little sweethearts in the mix), mothering the most adorable two year old on this globe, or rushing to meet the deadline for a writing project on Elance. In my spare time I enjoy a stroll along the beach with my doting husband.

About Marsha Buchanan


As a Jamaican girl raised in a devout church family headed by my mother, I have always had my natural hair, no chemical processing. After years of mistreating it , often ignorant of that fact, I began my healthy hair journey in January 2013 in fact, I have seen to it that my entire household falls in line where this is concerned. When I am not poring over some hair blog or forum I spend my time teaching English to rowdy high school students (ok maybe I have some little sweethearts in the mix), mothering the most adorable two year old on this globe, or rushing to meet the deadline for a writing project on Elance. In my spare time I enjoy a stroll along the beach with my doting husband.

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Comments

  1. maria

    Go for it! For me I will reserve the mud masks for pimpled oily skin that needs to be stripped of all oils and left feeling tight and as dry as the Sahara desert. I personally think mud masks are way to harsh to come anywhere near my hair. If you have very oily hair it may be good. My hair is delicate so I will RUN in the opposite direction !

  2. Lunye'

    I love clay treatments…I use Bentonite, Soapnit and Rhassoul for cleansing…amla, neem, tulsi, hibiscus, kupur and others for a number of things, conditioning, treating the scalp…I use Henna, hibiscus and indigo for coloring…I have noticed a bid difference is how long my hair stays moisturized, length retention, less shedding, and a soother scalp since using them…most of mine I mix with a tea or aloe vera juice, I add a few capfuls of ACV, and oils my hair like…sometimes honey if it is humid out, coconut milk when I am using one to condition my hair….did an amla treatment on my friend last night and she loved the way her curls popped and how soft her hair felt after rinsing…Some are stronger than others, when using Bentonite or Soapnut, I have to use a good deep conditioner afterwards, but with Rhassoul you can opt not too, it cleanses and conditions…the others mentioned are all ayruvedic and I have had not issues with any of them drying out my hair, but I do add the oils and coconut milk to them also…

  3. Zelphia

    I use Rhassoul clay mixture and my hair loves it!!

  4. Mickalynn

    I am curious but my current regimen is locking in the upmost moisture. After finally finding something that works I am not feeling adventrous. I would love to see more people with my 4c hair type, trying the clay/mud before I step out into the unknown. Thanks for the good good knowledge even if i am a scaredy cat….

  5. Honeyamber1

    I bought Bentonite Clay about 8 months ago or so because I watched a few of my favorite Youtubers use it and I’ve got to admit, I’m excited to try it. I recently tried Henna, Amla, and Indigo for their conditioning, strengthening, coloring benefits and so far I like the results. Most of my grays are covered, hair’s shinier, less shedding and breakage, what more could a girl want!

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